We often talk about the fact that we see a sort of a renaissance for classic shoes nowadays, and yet another example of this is how we more and more see shoes produced in ways tha is closer to art than products supposed to be worn. It’s also what Christophe Corthays new interesting project Tranchet Vif is about. Also info on an upcoming contest in the next newsletter where one can win a well filled shoe care valet box from Care of Carl.

 

At the beginning of the last century, and also before that, there was a relatively large branch of shoemaking that made shoes which focused exclusively on maximizing the craft and create shoes that were exhibition pieces rather than something that would be worn. For example, it was common with competitions where you did a shoe in such an exceptional manner as possible, which were then judged by a jury and winner’s gained high prestige. Projects that were closer to the art world was also quite common. This part of the classic shoe sphere also gave echo in the production of mainly bespoke shoes for regular use, because people pushed themselves to develop crafts and techniques, which then in some ways could be transferred also to the standard production.

 

Artistical and experimental from Hidetaka Fukaya.

Artistical and experimental from Hidetaka Fukaya.

One of several extraordinary pieces, cause that's what one needs to call them, made by Noriyuki Misawa. Bild: Misawa

One of several extraordinary pieces, cause that’s what one needs to call them, made by Noriyuki Misawa. Bild: Misawa

 

In the mid 1900’s, this became much more uncommon, but in recent years we have seen an increasing interest in similar subjects, with shoes made more for show than anything else. For example we have the Florence based Japanese Hidetaka Fukaya who makes some shoes more as experiments and artworks, and even his shoes for customers often are quite experimental. Or  theJapanese Noriyuki Misawa which will next year be exhibiting in Tokyo, where he recreated different types of historical shoes who are made something that looks more like sculptures, a very interesting project.

 

Artistically and experimentally from Tranchet Vif. Picture (even top photo): Mayaro Paris

Artistically and experimentally from Tranchet Vif. Picture (also top picture): Mayaro Paris

 

Tranchet Vif is newly started, so which way the project will take is as yet little hard to say. As some probably know Christophe Corthay some time ago left the brand that he had run since the beginning of the 90’s together with his brother Pierre. Corthay is one of the brands that have always made shoes that have been relatively artistic in nature in many cases, and it’s this side that Christophe is now working on to develop further. Together with another shoemaker and a person that manages the development and administration, they have started Tranchet Vif. They are based in an artisan/artist collective called Mayaro Paris, where they recently set up their workshop. Now the first sample shoes are being manufactured. The idea is as I understand things that Tranchet Vif’s shoes should be a kind of fusion between art and craftmanshop, making bespoke shoes which are anything but conventional. It’s also evident on the first images which are featured in this article, for example, the very interesting horseshoe heel and some specially designed models. The price tag is also expected to land very high for an order, but the goal is to make as beautiful and well-made shoes that there absolutely will be a demand anyway.
On December 2, Christophe Corthay participate in an event in Brüssels organized by Styles & Crafts, where one will probably get to know more about and see more from Tranchet Vif.

 

Special ghillie, where the toe portion and the patina has a part in common with Corthay. Photo: Hugo Canivence

Special ghillie, where the toe portion and the patina has a part in common with Corthay. Photo: Hugo Canivenc

Tranchet Vif's workshop.

Tranchet Vif’s workshop.

Lasts in different types of materials.

Lasts in various materials.

Model development.

Model development.

Pattern and parts of a shoe, which looks to be a mix of materials with both calf, lizard, alligator and possibly suede. Images above: Styles & Crafts

Pattern and parts of a shoe, which looks to be a mix of materials with both calf, lizard, alligator and possibly suede. Images above: Styles & Crafts

Another samplesko with a massive "tear" cut out of the leather. Picture: Hugo Canivenc

Another samplesko with a massive “tear” cut out of the leather. Picture: Hugo Canivenc

A shoe with the amazing horseshoe heel and a Mayaro's signature drawing on the sole. Picture: Mayaro Paris

A shoe with the amazing horseshoe heel and a Mayaro’s signature drawing on the sole. Picture: Mayaro Paris

 

 

 


For those of you who missed itShoegazing has since a while back a newsletter which is sent out every other week, summarizing what has happened on the blog, a calendar of upcoming shoe events around the world, and more. There will also be some competitions and exclusive offers in the newsletter from time to time, and in next week’s mailing it’s time for the first competition. It’s made in cooperation with the Swedish based online store Care of Carl, who invested massively in quality shoes in recent times, offering among other’s Loake, Heschung, Crockett & Jones, John Lobb Paris and Edward Green. The winner of the contest will receive a luxurious shoe care valet box in wood from Loake, fully stocked with various shoe care products and brushes. More info in the newsletter (will only be for residents in Sweden, Norway and Denmark), and if you are not signed up for it yet than you can do it here.

 

The box you can win in next week's newsletter competition. Photo: Care of Carl

The box you can win in next week’s newsletter competition. Photo: Care of Carl