For those who enjoy themselves with polishing up a proper spit shine on their shoes, a problem often arises. Traditionally, the polishing equipment consists of a horsehair brush, but when you apply a spit shine to your shoes, and especially to the toe area, using a brush with horse hair bristles causes problems: tiny, tiny scratches form on the glass-like surface. The horsehair is simply too hard, and scratches the polish surface. However, there is an excellent solution to this: a super soft goat hair finishing brush.

 

If you go over a toe cap like this with a horsehair brush, tiny microscopic scratches will form. They may not be visible from a distance, but the shine is slightly diminished, and if you've worked up such a nice shine, you obviously want it to be perfect, not scratchy.

If you go over a toe cap like this with a horsehair brush, tiny microscopic scratches will form. They may not be visible from a distance, but the shine is slightly diminished, and if you’ve worked up such a nice shine, you obviously want it to be perfect, not scratchy.

Goat hair is quite a lot softer than horsehair and therefore becomes more gentle. When you just want to work in and remove excess of regular shoe cream or just add a simple shine with wax polish, a horsehair brush works better, as well as when you just want to brush away dirt on such shoes. The goat hair shoe brush is especially good to have when you have a proper shine which needs to be finished. With the soft goat’s hair brush it is possible to work in the entire polish layer even on the toe without risking a lot of small scratches. I always finish with the nylon cloth anyway for the very last finish, and if you don’t own a goat hair brush but are polishing the spit shine, it’s best to avoid going on with the horsehair brush over the toe area, and just use the nylon cloth there. Another thing to keep in mind is that if you have a shoe with a high shine on the toe, if you are to remove dirt from this, you want o avoid going over it with the horsehair brush. The goat’s hair brush is also ideal here, as you also want to remove dust and such also at the sole edge. Do use a different goat hair brush for when you finish polishing and to remove dirt.

Quite a few offer goat hair shoe brushes today. We have a popular affordable one at Skolyx, the German shoe care brand Collonil has one, Kirby Allison has a nice goat hair brush, Brookman has a great one, my personal favourite but certainly an expensive finishing brush comes from Boot Black, and there’s plenty of others. If you don’t own a goat hair brush yet, do get a hold of one and give it a try, you’d most likely love using it.

The goat hair is soft and delicate, and the densely placed bristles makes it feels almost like cat fur. Picture: Skolyx